×
Home / PREGNANT  / PREGNANCY MONTH BY MONTH  / Seven Months Pregnant: What to Expect
Month -7

Seven Months Pregnant: What to Expect

Month -7

WEEK TWENTY FIVEWEEK TWENTY SIXWEEK TWENTY SEVENWEEK TWENTY EIGHT

WEEK TWENTY FIVE

Your baby is the size of a cauliflower.

Your baby has developed a sense of equilibrium. Your baby can tell which way is up and which way is down. Other than this development, he/she’s still doing much of the same activities that he/she has in the past few weeks. Your baby is gaining weight and getting stronger to brave the world. Your baby is also growing quite a bit more hair. You’re feeling much stronger kicks and punches now, too. Interestingly you baby has periods of waking and sleeping, and these are probably becoming pretty obvious to you. You are certain to notice when you’ve awakened your baby. Before long, those kicks and punches may become painful, so enjoy them now, while they’re likely just a little startling.

YOUR BODY

Now that you’re 25 weeks pregnant, you’ll be gaining somewhere between 226 and 453 grams of weight each week. The weight gain will stay steady until the end of your pregnancy. In the last few weeks, it may even increase a bit. While you’re probably quite hungry these days (since your baby is growing fast!) it’s important to look at what you’re eating, if you want an insight into why your appetite is not satisfied. Empty calories can leave us with empty tummies, craving more food. Stick to healthy, nutritious foods instead of highly processed sugary treats. Your baby’s health and growth depends on you making good food choices. Your own health — and even your birth experience — can be affected by what you eat too. 

In addition to putting up with all those annoying symptoms, you’re probably really enjoying how fast your nails and hair are growing. In fact, your hair may be thicker now, too. Be prepared, however, that some women experience some hair loss after their baby is born. It shouldn’t be significant enough for others to notice; it will likely just be you shedding enough hair to return to your hair’s normal thickness (before pregnancy). So, don’t panic if you see clumps of hair falling out a couple of weeks after the baby arrives.

TIPS & TO DOS

Your uterus is soccer ball-sized and stretching your skin. All that accommodation may cause your belly to itch. Slather on moisturizer or calamine lotion if needed.

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Heartburn or Indigestion
  • Snoring: Snoring is quite common during pregnancy, since increased blood flow to mucous membranes in your nose can cause congestion. But if you find your snoring is seriously interfering with your sleep, this could be a sign that you have sleep apnea (which can deprive you of oxygen) — so ask your practitioner about it.
  • Tingling Hands (Carpal Tunnel): Increased blood volume during pregnancy can cause swelling that puts pressure on nerves in the wrists, resulting in carpal tunnel syndrome. Ask your practitioner about wearing wrist braces or consider trying acupuncture to alleviate the pain and tingling.
  • Varicose Veins: The extra blood volume you produce during pregnancy also puts pressure on your blood vessels and causes them to bulge, resulting in varicose veins. Help keep blood circulating by avoiding clothes that are binding.
  • Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD): If you’re feeling pain in the pelvic area, you may be experiencing SPD, caused by relaxed and stretchy ligaments that normally keep your pelvic joint (the symphysis pubis) aligned. Stay on top of your Kegel exercises and pelvic tilts, which will strengthen the muscles in that region. If the pain is severe, ask your practitioner for a referral to a physical therapist.
  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS): As if you didn’t have enough to worry about with tingling hands, you may also feel a tingling in your legs, accompanied by an urge to move them. Ask your practitioner to test you for iron-deficiency anemia since some experts think it’s linked to RLS; keep a food journal too — some women find that a sensitivity to certain foods makes symptoms worse
  • Fast-Growing Hair: Because normal daily hair loss is suppressed by pregnancy hormones, you may notice that your hair feels thicker and more lustrous than ever before. Enjoy it now — after delivery, all the hair that didn’t fall out during pregnancy will shed.

BACK TO THE TOP

WEEK TWENTY SIX

Your baby is the size of a head of lettuce.

Your baby’s eyes are forming now, and soon they’ll be opening and closing. Your baby is taking lots of breaths now, though they aren’t yet of oxygen. Your  baby’s immune system is developing, too. Right now this development consists primarily of absorbing your antibodies to get ready for the outside world. Your baby’s movements are also much stronger, and can even begin to be painful sometimes. When a foot or elbow gets out of place and becomes uncomfortable, you can often push your baby back into a position that’s more comfortable for you. This week, your baby probably weighs between 600 grams and 1.2 kg, and is about 34-38 cm long.

YOUR BODY

At 26 weeks pregnant, you’re two-thirds of the way through your pregnancy, and your uterus is about two and a half inches above your belly button. And speaking of your belly button, have you noticed that it’s taken on a life of its own — a larger-than-life life? A newly-outie belly button may not be your idea of forward fashion (especially when you have a belly piercing or when your once innie belly button now bulges through tight clothes), but it’s de rigueur for the pregnant set. And it’s easy to understand why.

Beginning somewhere around the middle to end of your second trimester, your enlarging uterus swells enough to push your abdomen forward, making your navel pop out . Your belly button should revert to its regular position a few months after delivery.

If a full night’s rest eludes you, welcome to the world of pregnancy insomnia. Between heartburn and leg cramps, bathroom runs and the protruding navel, it’s no wonder your body’s having trouble calming down and drifting off. But there are lots of tactics that should help keep you in bed (and asleep!) instead of pacing the floor; these include daytime exercise, a daily dose of fresh air and limiting fluids before you hit the bed.

TIPS & TO DOS

A healthy mom-to-be has likely put on between 16 and 22 pounds by now. If you fall out of that range, talk to your doc about weight gain during pregnancy.

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Bloating & Gas
  • Increased Vaginal Discharge
  • Migraines
  • Pregnancy Brain
  • Clumsiness
  • Round Ligament Pain
  • Blurred Vision

BACK TO THE TOP

WEEK TWENTY SEVEN

Your baby is the size of a Rutabaga.

He/she is starting to show brain activity now, which will continue to develop in complexity over the next few weeks. Your baby’s lungs are developing rapidly, and though they won’t be completely developed until the very end of your pregnancy, they have made great strides. The baby’s breathing is becoming more rapid. Your baby probably weighs somewhere between 600 grams and 1.3 kg, and is about 35-40 cm long.

Big news: Your baby may recognise both your and your partner’s voices by now. The auditory development (hearing) is progressing as the network of nerves to the ears matures — though the sounds heard by your baby are muffled thanks to the creamy coating of vernix covering its ears. So this might be a good time to read and even sing to your baby (or rather, your belly).

Your baby’s taste buds are quite developed now as well (with more taste buds than he or she will ever have outside the womb, actually). Need a taste test? If you eat spicy food, your baby will be able to taste the difference in the amniotic fluid (but keep in mind that you’ll have different mealtimes, with your baby’s coming about two hours after yours). Some babies will even respond to that spicy kick by hiccupping. And although hiccups (which feel like belly spasms to you) may seem like they’re disturbing to your baby, he or she isn’t stressed at all. It’s just one more sensation that babies need to get used to.

YOUR BODY

Two weeks ago, your belly was a soccer ball — and by 27 weeks pregnant, your uterus has swelled to the size of a basketball. Unfortunately, that’s not the only thing that’s swelling. Beginning somewhere around this stage of pregnancy, nearly three in four pregnant women start to experience mild swelling of the extremities — particularly the feet, ankles and hands. Called Edema, it occurs when fluids build up in your body tissues thanks (or no thanks) to increased blood flow, and uterine pressure on the Vena Cava (the large vein on the right side of your body that returns blood from your lower limbs to the heart).

While you may have a hard time squeezing into shoes or getting your rings on or off, keep in mind that the puff factor is completely normal and temporary. But if it seems to be excessive, talk to your practitioner; it can be one sign of preeclampsia (though when it is, it’s accompanied by a variety of other symptoms like elevated blood pressure and protein in the urine; if you aren’t experiencing these symptoms you have nothing to worry about). To spell swell relief, avoid sitting or standing for a long time; try some pregnancy-appropriate exercise like walking or swimming (if your practitioner okays it), and sit or sleep with your feet elevated (if anyone deserves to put her feet up, it’s you). Be sure, too, to drink enough each day; restricting fluid intake will not decrease swelling, but keeping hydrated. And try to look on the bright side: Edema is a temporary condition — you’ll deflate completely soon after you give birth.

TIPS & TO DOS

We know you’re gassy. It’s normal! To help curb your flatulence, you may want to swap flatulence-causing foods like broccoli and asparagus for less-gassy options like spinach and carrots.

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Faintness or Dizziness
  • Bleeding Gums
  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)
  • Itchy Belly
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Round Ligament Pain

BACK TO THE TOP

WEEK TWENTY EIGHT

Your baby is the size of an eggplant.

Your baby is settling into the proper position for birth, with the head facing downward (toward your body’s nearest exit!). Your little work in progress is now about 2.5 pounds and almost 16 inches long (measured head to toe), very busy these days blinking. That skill is just one of an already impressive repertoire of tricks your baby has been working on, like coughing, more intense sucking, hiccupping and, perhaps most important, better breathing.

Brain wave activity measured in a developing fetus shows different sleep cycles, including the rapid eye movement phase — the stage when dreaming occurs.

YOUR BODY

You’ve almost made it through the third trimester and even though you’re on the home stretch, you’re probably about ready to be done with pregnancy! In your final trimester, you’ll feel the physical toll of pregnancy. The extra weight can lead to musculo-skeletal pain, and fatigue can slow you down even more.

As your baby gets settled into a proper position for birth, the head (and your enlarging uterus) may rest on the sciatic nerve in the lower part of your spine. If that happens, you may feel sharp, shooting pain, tingling or numbness that starts in your buttocks and radiates down the back of your legs — otherwise known as sciaticaYou might also find it harder and harder to get comfortable whether you’re trying to sleep, sit at work, or relax on the couch. Shortness of breath can also plague pregnant women during the final trimester.

TIPS & TO DOS

  • Do you know your rhesus (Rh) status? If not, it’s important to find out. If you are Rh negative and your baby is Rh positive, you’ll need an anti-D injection this week.
  • Breasts feeling different? Tender lumps are common during the third trimester, but still, they shouldn’t be ignored. Ask your health care provider for a breast exam at your next check-up.
  • Your baby absorbs the majority of his iron stores during the third trimester, so nosh on iron-rich foods: chicken, beans, spinach, tofu, beef and enriched cereals are great.

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Bloating & Gas
  • Faintness or Dizziness
  • Stuffy Nose
  • Bleeding Gums
  • Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD): This funny pregnancy symptom develops when the hormone relaxin makes the ligaments in your pelvic joint too relaxed and stretchy, causing the pelvic joint to become unstable. If this is causing you pain, ask your doctor about wearing a pelvic support belt (available online), which stabilizes the ligaments and helps keep the pelvic joint in place.
  • Mask Of Pregnancy (Chloasma): Pregnancy hormones can cause hyperpigmentation of the skin, particularly if you have dark skin to begin with. This can result in darker freckles or moles, a dark line down the center of your tummy (linea nigra) or patches of darkened skin on your face (called chloasma). Don’t worry, most discolorations fade a few months after giving birth — just do your best to stay in the shade since sunlight can intensity hyper-pigmentation

BACK TO THE TOP

Information Credit: Whattoexpect.com




By Silver Rattle

YOUR COMMENTS