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Three Months Pregnant : What to Expect

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WEEK NINEWEEK TENWEEK ELEVENWEEK TWELVE

WEEK NINE

Your baby is now the size of an olive.

This week, your baby gets the organs they’ll need to, well, make their own baby one day. That’s right – reproductive organs are beginning to form now, along with some other key organs, like the pancreas and gallbladder. The tiny fingers are growing longer, and the ends are slightly enlarged right now – highlighting the areas where the fingerprints will ultimately form.

YOUR BODY

As your blood volume continues to increase, you might feel the effects through dizziness and frequent urination. The good news though, is that from next week, as your hormone levels stabilize, you’ll start feeling a lot better. Make sure you drink lots of water since you’ll be throwing up.

You might see the effects – bulging veins on your hands and feet, or nosebleeds. But this extra blood is there for good reason – it’ll help protect your baby when you stand up or lie down, and it safeguards against the blood loss you’ll experience during labour and delivery.

Progesterone and oestrogen pumping through your body in the first trimester can bring on a roller coaster of emotional changes. Hormones aside, worrying about your baby’s health and the future can also leave you feeling blue. Making some ‘me’ time is an important part of looking after your emotional health during your pregnancy. And avoid stress as much as you can.

TIPS & TO DO’s

  • If big meals are a big turnoff, eat at least six smaller, but nutrient-packed mini-meals and snacks throughout the day
  • If experiencing heart burn, try antacids. They contain extra calcium, which you need during pregnancy
  • If you’re 35 or older, or if you have a family history of genetic conditions, now’s the time to consider talking to your doctor about common genetic tests, including NIPT or CVS, usually performed between 9 to 12 weeks.
  • Try exercising; at least take walks, if you can’t do anything else
  • It is fine to take paracetamol if having headaches – but nothing more than paracetamol

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Frequent Urination
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea & Vomiting
  • Other tummy issues: constipation, indigestion, bloating or heartburn

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WEEK TEN

Your baby is now the size of a prune.

Bones and cartilage are forming, and small indentations on the legs are developing into knees and ankles. The arms (complete with elbows) can flex already. Though your baby’s arms are taking shape and getting stronger, each one is only about the size of this number 1.

This week, your baby gets little choppers forming under the gums. (Those pearly whites won’t break through the gums until your baby is close to six months old.) Other systems are growing, too. Your baby’s stomach is producing digestive juices, and the kidneys are producing larger quantities of urine.

Most impressive? At this point, your baby’s brain is developing at astounding rates – nearly 250,000 neurons are forming every minute! The end of the embryonic stage also marks a turning point for development dangers – your baby is much less susceptible to them now.

YOUR BODY

And it’s not just your baby who’s growing – you’re growing too. Your uterus (womb) is now the size of a grapefruit. You may even be able to feel it above the middle of your pubic bone. You’ll notice a slight roundness around your waist. Your breast development and changes are critical in the first trimester. During the first few weeks, progesterone causes milk glands to develop and estrogen stimulates growth of the milk duct. Breasts typically expand one or two bra cup sizes, veins get darker, and nipples get larger, more erect and darker so that eventually, the baby can find them easily.

A slight increase in discharge/fluid during pregnancy is normal. You may find that it is a mild-smelling, milky fluid, which is fine. Your body creates discharge to help prevent infections travelling up the vagina to the womb.
If you have green, yellow or brown discharge – or if you’re bleeding – you should contact your doctor.

TIPS & TO DO’s

  • Increase your intake of whole-grains and vegetables – they will help with your constipation

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Fatigue
  • Nausea & Vomiting
  • Food Craving & Aversions
  • Heart Burn & Indigestion
  • Bloating & Gas
  • Increased Vaginal Discharge
  • Occasional Headaches
  • Faintness & Dizziness
  • Visible Veins
  • Round Ligament Pains

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WEEK ELEVEN

Well, you’re nearing the end of your first trimester, and your baby (who is the size of  a lime) is  getting the fitness patterns right – kicking and stretching, with somersaults and forward rolls.

Did you know your baby can breathe underwater? She’s doing it right now! At weeks 10 and 11, the fetus will start to inhale and exhale small amounts of Amniotic fluid, which helps your baby’s lungs to grow and develop.

Also this week, most organs and body structures are formed and beginning to function. Genitals begin to take on either male or female form. Eyes have completely closed and won’t open again until week 26. Kidneys are making wee and the stomach is producing gastric juices. Your baby no longer needs his nutrient-rich yolk sac, because other organs have taken over.

YOUR BODY

Constant hunger pangs ? That’s a great sign, and implies that your morning sickness is easing and your appetite is gearing up to help nourish you and your baby. But don’t go overboard just because you believe you’re eating for two. Try to gain weight efficiently, by choosing the most nutritious foods during pregnancy.

Has the bulge started to show yet? If this is your first pregnancy, you might feel a bit bloated, and getting into those favourite trousers might be a bit of a stretch, especially after a big meal. But some women have a little baby-belly pouch by the end of the first trimester. After all, your uterus is now the size of a grapefruit. At your next exam, your doctor will be able to feel the top of it.

TIPS & TO DO’s

  • Your breasts may be getting bigger, so now might be a good time to invest in a good support bra, preferably non-wired
  • Wash your hands regularly because the more colds you have now, the likelier your baby will develop asthma

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Fatigue
  • Nausea & Vomiting
  • Food Craving & Aversions
  • Heart Burn & Indigestion
  • Bloating & Gas
  • Faintness & Dizziness
  • Mood Swings
  • Leg Cramps
  • Excessive Saliva
  • Breast Tenderness
  • Frequent Urination

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WEEK TWELVE

Your baby is the size of a plum and weighs a full half ounce.

This week, the herculean task of developing new bodily structures is nearing an end, as most of your baby’s systems are fully formed – though there’s still plenty of maturing to do. Now comes the maintenance phase, during which your fetus’ systems continue to mature for the next 28 weeks and the organs get to work. For one thing, the fetal digestive system is beginning to flex its digestive muscles — literally — as it starts beginning to practice contraction movements, a skill your baby will need after birth to push food through the digestive tract. The bone marrow is busy making white blood cells, weapons which will one day help your baby fight infection once he’s out of your safe haven (including all those germs passed around the snot-nosed playgroup). The pituitary gland at the base of the brain has started producing the hormones that’ll enable him (or her) to make babies of his (or her) own, in a couple of decades.

Also, If you haven’t already had the pleasure, it’s likely that at this month’s checkup you’ll finally hear your baby’s fetal heartbeat — a sound that will make your heart race with joy!

YOUR BODY

Until now, your uterus has fit snugly within your pelvis. But as it begins to move north this week, the pressure on your bladder should start to let up a bit. This also means your belly has the room to swell, giving you that slightly rounded, “Yes, I’m pregnant!” look. And if your world is a little blurrier than usual, don’t be alarmed. The extra fluid your body retains during pregnancy may also thicken your lens and cornea (the outermost layer of your eye), and the pressure of the fluid within your eyeball may change as well. Together, these changes can cause blurry vision. Your vision should self-correct within two months of your baby’s birth, but let your doctor know about your eye symptoms, as they could also signal hypertension or diabetes.

TIPS & TO DO’s

  • It’ll soon be time to tell your boss, co-workers, and distant relatives about your condition, if they haven’t figured it out already
  • Take brisk walks, eat high-fiber foods, and drink plenty of water to keep your intestinal tract moving
  • Squeeze pelvic floor muscles for 5-10 seconds 10-20 times a day. Building these bladder and uterus supporting muscles reduce your chances of bladder issues.

COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Fatigue
  • Bloating & Gas
  • Decreased Urge to Urinate Frequently
  • Increased Sense of Smell
  • Increased Vaginal Discharge
  • Occasional Headaches
  • Excessive Saliva

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Information Credit: Whattoexpect.com




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